Categories
disruptive technology mobile development

SMS is still king despite Smartphones, Twitter and WhatsApp

So why does text messaging still thrives despite smartphones, Twitter And WhatsApp? One would think that since SMS still costs users so much money, they would be more inclined to use other means available on smartphones such as Facebook Chat, WhatsApp, Twitter, etc. 

Nobody disputes that SMS  is the king of mobile communications today. 7.8 trillion SMS messages were sent last year, according to Portio Research. Another firm, Informa, counted 5.9 trillion text messages worldwide last year, comprising 64% of mobile messaging traffic. You also have research showing that in developed countries, texting has just become more popular than voice calling.

Not only is SMS on top, but it’s still growing substantially. Portio predicted earlier this year that it will increase 23% this year to 9.6 trillion SMS messages.

This all leads me to believe that there is a long way to go before a developer (or the futurism business) develops something that has the likelihood of taking over SMS for the majority of mobile users. What exactly will it take? I have been wrestling with this thought for the last week and a half and have not a clue. I am excited for the day something takes over SMS and alleviates all of the brushes I accrue by college students bumping into my while walking the halls texting friends and family.So why does text messaging still thrives despite smartphones, Twitter And WhatsApp? One would think that since SMS still costs users so much money, they would be more inclined to use other means available on smartphones such as Facebook Chat, WhatsApp, Twitter, etc. 

Nobody disputes that SMS  is the king of mobile communications today. 7.8 trillion SMS messages were sent last year, according to Portio Research. Another firm, Informa, counted 5.9 trillion text messages worldwide last year, comprising 64% of mobile messaging traffic. You also have research showing that in developed countries, texting has just become more popular than voice calling.

Not only is SMS on top, but it’s still growing substantially. Portio predicted earlier this year that it will increase 23% this year to 9.6 trillion SMS messages.

This all leads me to believe that there is a long way to go before a developer (or the futurism business) develops something that has the likelihood of taking over SMS for the majority of mobile users. What exactly will it take? I have been wrestling with this thought for the last week and a half and have not a clue. I am excited for the day something takes over SMS and alleviates all of the brushes I accrue by college students bumping into my while walking the halls texting friends and family. 

 

Why Text Messaging Still Thrives Despite Smartphones, Twitter And WhatsApp | Innovation.

Leave a Reply