Categories
Android mobile development mobile news usability

Android Development in the Cloud

About a year ago I wrote about cloud development tools for Android. At the time, there was only one available that had been specifically designed for Android development, though demand for such tools was on the rise. This article talks about the cloud service for Android called Codenvy. Also it talks about how it is not the only cloud service available.

 

Android Development in the Cloud

 

Categories
mobile development mobile news usability

JetBrains builds on Google Android collaboration for new IntelliJ IDEA

Building on a collaboration with Google, software vendor JetBrains has updated its IntelliJ IDEA Java IDE (integrated development environment) to offer more capabilities for creating applications to run on Android devices. IntelliJ IDEA 13 also features a number of improvements in how it supports the Java Spring framework, which is an essential component for Pivotal’s newly launched business intelligence PaaS (platform as a service). This article goes into great detail about the collaboration

 

JetBrains builds on Google Android collaboration for new IntelliJ IDEA

Categories
Android disruptive technology mobile development mobile news usability

Applebee’s plans to install tablets at every table

National restaurant chain Applebee’s has just cut a deal to install 100,000 tablets at tables within at least 1,800 locations. While Chili’s announced a similar move three months ago, this is one of the largest, public tablet deployments within a U.S. company. Applebee’s plans to complete the roll out at all U.S. locations by the end of 2014 and Applebee’s parent company DineEquity is considering launching similar tablets at IHOP locations as well.

The tablets will have 7-inch screens, basically the same size as a Google Nexus 7 or Amazon Kindle Fire HDX tablet, and operate on a custom version of Android. The tablets also allow customers to pay for their meal at any time, ideal for anyone in a rush. For families, the tablets will include a variety of video games that can be accessed through a modest fee.

http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/applebees-rolls-plan-install-tablets-every-table/

Categories
Android mobile development mobile news usability

a dual screen smartphone has becoming a reality

The second generation YotaPhone is expected to come out in 2014. This phone is very unique because it does not just have one screen on the front, but it has second one on the back. The second screen is not an equal screen like the front, it is black and white and can offer mirroring of apps or provide interactive purpose.  THe example on the website showed that you can pull up Google Maps on the front LCD screen but if you saw your phone was about to die or wanted to use lower battery you could mirror it to the back screen and it would use less battery because it is black and white and not using all the pixels.  This phone is still in a prototype stage and it does not seem very practical, but it could bring some cool innovation.  For me personally if i was worried about battery, I would rather get a case with a battery built in to give me more hours on my device versus switching over to a black and white screen that is similar to the first Kindle.

 

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57614485-94/second-generation-yotaphone-already-slated-for-late-2014-launch/

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development mobile news Uncategorized usability

Glass is already becoming a problem while driving

In California a woman, Cecilia Abadie was pulled over for speeding but was also given another ticket for wearing Google Glass while driving.  Google Glass is a new piece of technology that fits over the eyes and gives many of Google’s services virtually hands free and right in front of the user. Cecilia Abadie claims the glasses were not on when she was driving, but this case opens up an interesting topic on how Glass will be handled while driving.  Over the years texting and driving has become a bigger problem and more and more states are making it illegal to text and drive because it distracts drivers from the road.  Google Glass is a new form of mobile technology and it is not even out yet and it is causing problems.  It will be interesting to see how google glass and other mobile devices besides phone impact the law, especially the laws of the road.  This is a prime example of disruptive technology because with this new industry it is changing how humans are doing everyday things.

 

Categories
iPad mobile news resource usability

Dell’s Venue 8 Tablet falls short

Heavier than the iPad, a battery with a lackluster life, dim screen, sensitive touchscreen, and a more to be desired camera.
It displays natural colors though, and has a good USB port.

http://mashable.com/2013/11/27/dell-venue-8-tablet-review/

Categories
iOS mobile development usability

21.8% of Black Friday purchases were made on mobile devices

Over 20% of sales were made on mobile devices Friday, with iOS making up 18.1% of that traffic. Smartphones made more traffic than tablets, however, tablets had twice the number of sales.

http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/12/02/1636216/over-20-of-online-black-friday-sales-came-from-mobile-devices

Categories
mobile news usability

Q3 Mobile Usage

This article talks about what users have spent their time on with their mobile devices. In this class, usability is an important topic, and if we know what people use mobile for, we can make money. http://venturebeat.com/2013/11/26/here-is-what-people-did-on-mobile-devices-in-q3-by-number-of-impressions-report/

Categories
disruptive technology resource usability

OFF Pocket, designed to prevent GPS tracking

A new start-up has launched a Kickstarter campaign to introduce a new phone case to consumers that are concerned with tracking and privacy issues. Their product named OFF Pocket is designed to block all signals coming to and from your smartphone by means of a case that interferes with the signals. It is reported to block Wi-Fi, Cellular and GPS signals. People might say why don’t you just shutdown the device but most devices still transmit even when completely off so this product would even stop that. The technology is like an electric field blocker similar to that of a Faraday Cage. This is a good product for consumers worried about their privacy but it isn’t quite practical in my opinion. The case offers little protection as it is just a metal fabric cloth like sack that you place your phone in. Also what happens when you have to take your phone out to use it? You will become ‘visible’ again and you’ll have to wait for your phone to load all of the data from when it was not reachable.

Sources: OffPocket.com, Popular Science

Categories
mobile news usability

Here is what people did on mobile devices in Q3, by number of impressions

Mobile advertising is becoming more prevalent with every year that passes, and Q3 of this year was no exception to the trend. The reports talked about in this article used “impressions”, or number of times an ad is displayed on a page, to see what mobile device users were doing with their devices. They also determined that Apple topped the list for both manufacturers and devices (as ranked by impressions) with three of the top four devices being Apple products. This study indicates that impressions increased lifestyle and sports applications by six times the usual amount. There are many other interesting numbers talked about in the article, so if you want to know more about this study please click the link to the article below.

Source: Here is what people did on mobile devices in Q3, by number of impressions

Categories
usability

New mobile chat application supports up to 500 participants

Quad’s Mobile Messaging App For College Groups Supports 500-Person Chats

A new mobile app targeted for college organizations such as fraternities or sororities supports up to 500 participants. It is designed to be a solution for issues with email in such demographics. Economically, this is a useful example of “solutionism” in mobile apps for an aspiring developer.

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development mobile news usability Windows 8

Nokia Shareholders Approve Sale To Microsoft

The deal, which was first announced in September, is worth €5.44bn EUR ($7.35bn USD / £4.57bn GBP), and also includes provisions for Microsoft to license patents from the Finnish company. 78% of those eligible to vote had already voted before the EGM. Of those early votes, a staggering 99% had voted in favour of the sale to Microsoft.

via: http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/13/11/19/1429253/nokia-shareholders-approve-sale-to-microsoft

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development mobile news usability

Motorola working to build 3D printed phone

The company recently inked a deal with 3D Systems to develop a futuristic 3D-printing production platform for Project Ara, Motorola’s ambitious open-source mobile hardware ecosystem. Project Ara is a push to develop modularA phones, which would allow users to mix and match hardware with the ease of downloading and installing software. When Motorola announced Ara, the company specifically made mention of 3D printing as a key technology that would make an open-source hardware market feasible. Motorola just announced a multi-year development agreement with 3D Systems, the company that created the first 3D printer in the early 1980s and has developed 3D-printing technologies for both theA personal and industrial markets. As part of the agreement, 3D Systems has been tasked with developing an integrated, multi-material, high-speed production platform, which will include both conductive and functional materials. It’s fun to conjecture into the vacuum of the future, but the open-source hardware space is one that stands to disrupt the entire mobile market, especially with commercial titans backing it.

Categories
Android mobile news usability

Google Play warms up to tablet-friendly apps

Google Play now interacts better with tablets. The Android maker on Thursday announced that the Google Play store now includes a category called “Designed for tablets.” Tablet users will see the category as their default view in top lists but can still switch the view to all apps and games.

 

Google Play warms up to tablet-friendly apps

Categories
Android mobile development usability Windows 8

Gaming tablet from AMD speculation

AMDmight be joining the tablet market by launching the a gaming tablet codenamed Project Discovery. AMD, a well-known chipmaker, would be joining an already well developed field with many competitors. AMD’s gaming tablet would come equipped with a game controller and a docking station and with Windows 8.1. Right now, they are stating that they aren’t entering the tablet market at this time.

 

http://wind8apps.com/amd-gaming-tablet-windows-8-1/

Categories
mobile development mobile news usability Windows 8

Instagram is on Windows phones now but it isn’t all that

Instagram has been on Android and iOS phones for a couple of years now and it is just now being released onto Window’s phones.  The popular social media app is centered all around photos and videos and being able to share them easily and yet, even though Windows now has Instagram, it is anything but easy to share content.  The app does not allow for users to take photos or videos in the app directly, users have to upload the pictures and videos from their camera roll to upload them to Instagram.  This is a perfect example of how apps can sometimes cause additional steps instead of improving something.  Both the iOS and Android Instagram apps allow for users to open up their app and take photos directly from there without having to go into their camera roll even though they also provide the option of going into the camera roll and getting a photo or video.  Instagram has said this is in beta but they need to add more features to it to make it practical.

 

http://www.sfgate.com/technology/businessinsider/article/Instagram-Is-Finally-On-Windows-Phone-But-You-4996402.php

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development mobile news Uncategorized usability

Google Wallet just got a little more practical

Google wallet has been around for a while now, but it has not been very successful with having many users.  Today Google announced a Wallet Card that is a physical card for users to use in conjunction with Google Wallet.  How the card works is you have to put money on it before hand, so it serves as a prepaid card.  You swipe it just like you would any other credit or debit card after you first activate it online.  Google already has an android and ios app for Google Wallet where people can make it easier to put other 3rd party companies promos on it for free stuff and such.  The Wallet Card is in direct competition with the new Coin Card that can hold up to 8 credit cards at once.  This Wallet Card does not seem to be too practical because there already are prepaid debit cards out there.  I think that this is cool technology and Google has bigger plans for Wallet later on, but for right now it does not seem to be very practical and worth the money.

 

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2427423,00.asp

Categories
Android disruptive technology mobile development mobile news usability

The Galaxy Gear is reportedly an epic flop

BusinessKorea reports that Samsung has sold less than 50,000 Galaxy Gears so far, a stunningly low number that would put even the worst flops released this year to shame. That Samsung’s device has reportedly flopped this badly is rather surprising since the company poured a lot of money into an ad campaign designed to highlight its first-ever smartwatch.

via: http://bgr.com/2013/11/18/samsung-galaxy-gear-sales/

Categories
disruptive technology mobile news usability

HeadsUP! Displays Your Smartphone on Your Car’s Windshield

HeadsUP! Displays Your Smartphone on Your Car’s Windshield [VIDEO].

Distracted driving is a major problem in America, where drivers are constantly being alerted, notified and engaged by their smartphones and other mobile devices. Some states have even banned cell phone use completely while operating a vehicle. However, the people at NeXt may have found a safer way to use your cell phone in the car. HeadsUP! is a visual display that projects commonly used cell phone features like texting, voice calls and e-mail, onto the inside of your car’s windshield. Controlled by voice dictation and touch free swiping, users can interact with the screen without having to look down at their smartphone. Potential backers have been hesitant to support the HeadsUP! display due to concerns that interacting with a heads up display is not better than interacting with a cell phone. Potential backers are also concerned with the legality the HeadsUP! display, especially since one woman received a ticket in San Francisco for wearing Google Glass while driving. The HeadsUP! display is disruptive technology as it aims to replace our smartphones, at least while we’re inside our cars. The successful implementation of a HeadsUP! display unit would almost totally replace the common tasks that drivers use their phones for. It adds to the field of mobile technology by being one of the first to try bring heads up displays to the every day consumer. It will also serve as an example for others looking to enter the field as there are many questions and concerns with the idea of heads up displays in our vehicles. Finally, it adds to the field of mobile technology because of the $299 that NeXt is asking backers to pay. If successful, there is a possibility for the cost of this mobile technology to affect the prices of vehicles and the price of insurance as insurance companies are assuredly concerned over the thought of drivers looking anywhere else but the road.

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development usability

Bank on Coin as all-in-one credit card? It could cost you

Recently a credit card-sized device called Coin has been developed that allows users to store all of their credit cards on one device and select which card they want to use by pressing a button. This is very convenient for people that use multiple credit cards due to the small size of the device and the convenience of only having to carry one card around instead of many. The device includes built-in encryption and alerts the user if their Coin card surpasses as certain range from the linked smart phone. According to this article there a couple areas of concern. First, the battery that powers the device only lasts for up to two years of regular use. This means spending $100 every two years to obtain a new one since there is no way to recharge the battery. Second, convenience is questioned by many in terms of smart phone alerts when the card reaches a certain distance from the phone. False alarms may become a problem when the waiter/waitress takes the device for payment processing, which could prove to be very annoying and defeat the convenience the device creates. A third concern is if the device is somehow damage or lost, the user must get a new one. Even though there are problems that could arise with this new technology, I personally believe the convenience it creates outweighs the concerns talked in this summary.

Source: Bank on Coin as all-in-one credit card? It could cost you

Categories
mobile development mobile news usability

Mapping Indoor Locations With Your Smartphone

A recent race to develop a solution for mapping indoor locations with a smartphone has begun. There are many companies that are part of this race and some of them have developed technology that can map indoor locations but in a limited fashion. For example, WifiSLAM uses a combination of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to determine your position. The only problem so far, according to Harverninen, is, “It doesn’t work in a wooden house.” Another company called Indoor Atlas has filed 15 petitions, raised $600,000, and is actively working on this technology as I type this article summary. Indoor Atlas uses the magnetometers to detect anomalies in a magnetic field that come from such things as steel beams in buildings. Each building has its own unique magnetic signature. As a result, it doesn’t have to install hardware sensors inside structures at all. The technology works from mines underground to high-rise buildings. This technology being developed would mean no more getting lost in large buildings such as Las Vegas hotels and other large buildings around the world. To read more about this technology, access the source link below.

Source: Indoor Atlas uses magnetic sensors for finding places in the great indoors

Categories
Android iOS mobile development mobile news resource usability

There are actually two operating systems in every phone

Any phone with mobile communications capability  has 2 operating systems. Aside from the operating system that we as end-users see (Android, iOS, PalmOS), it also runs a small operating system that manages everything related to radio.

 

http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/13/11/13/0237214/the-second-operating-system-hiding-in-every-mobile-phone

Categories
usability

Mapquest releases new mobile app

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2013/11/mapquest-new-apps/

I found thins to be a notable article because of the new features that are implemented in the app. Solutions to problems in traffic that I didn’t really knew I had. For example, the app will tell you, “Bryant Street is just past Harrison Street. If you reach Brannan, you’ve gone too far.” I feel that economically, Mapquest made the right choice of reinventing the navigation niche instead of throwing in the towel after Google maps became the norm.

Categories
Android disruptive technology iOS iPhone mobile development mobile news usability

Mobile Devices Banned From UK Cabinet Meetings Over Surveillance Fears

British securities services fear foreign intelligence agencies have developed the ability to turn mobile devices such as phones and tablets into bugs without the owner’s knowledge, allowing them to eavesdrop on confidential meetings. According to the article, UK security services fear China, Russia and Pakistan have figured out a way to turn mobiles into microphones, and have them transmit even when they’re off.

via: http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/11/03/1654252/mobile-devices-banned-from-uk-cabinet-meetings-over-surveillance-fears

Categories
Android disruptive technology iOS iPad iPhone mobile development mobile news usability

Nearly 1 In 4 Adults Surf the Web While Driving

A new survey out this week says that the number of motorists who surf the Web has nearly doubled over the past four years. In 2009, 13 percent of motorists admitted that they’d accessed the Internet while driving. In 2013, that figure had jumped to 24 percent. Smartphones are the primary culprit, making the unsafe task even easier.

via: http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/13/11/13/1944237/nearly-1-in-4-adults-surf-the-web-while-driving

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development usability

Google patenting an electronic ‘throat tattoo’

http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/12/tech/innovation/google-throat-tattoo/index.html?hpt=te_t1

 

As Google Glass prepares to launch to the public, Google is stepping up the game with some rather crazy technology. The temporary throat tattoo will eliminate the need for a head/earpiece . The tattoo would communicate with smartphones for a enhanced mobile experience including the possibility for clearer voice calls and listening to music without headphones. Wearable technology is the next step towards getting ahead in mobile development, Google has shown to be the number one player.

131112095149-google-neck-tattoo-story-top

 

Categories
mobile news usability

Journalists banned from tweeting at 2014 Sochi Olympics: report – Washington Times

Journalists banned from tweeting at 2014 Sochi Olympics: report – Washington Times.

Yesterday, it was announced that journalists at the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games will not be allowed to use their smartphones or any other form of personal technology while covering the games. This means journalists are effectively banned from services like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Vine for the duration of the games. Visily Konov who is head of the state-run R-sport news agency made this announcement; the R-sport agency controls accreditation at the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games. This is an interesting announcement and can greatly hinder the ability for news organizations and those covering the games to communicate information with their audience in a timely manner. This announcement does not represent a new disruptive technology, the announcement effects current technology by placing restrictions on their usage. This does not add to the field of mobile tech development in any way and does not have a significant impact on the economic state of mobile technology.

Categories
disruptive technology mobile news usability

Swedish Kids Say their Parents Are Too Tech-Obsessed

Swedish Kids Say their Parents Are Too Tech-Obsessed.

While many parents in the United States are worried about the time their children are spending on their smartphones or tablets, Sweden’s problem is the polar opposite. 33% of Swedish parents surveyed, out of a total 591, admitted that the amount they use their phone or tablet was a “sore point” with their children. Their children echoed this and said their parents are the ones spending too much time on the devices. “Sweden has the second highest smartphone adoption rate in western Europe at 63% of adults.” The way smartphones are being used in Sweden has a societal impact and demonstrates the ability for these technologies to alter the daily lives of the users, sometimes in unfavorable ways. Smartphones have proven to be disruptive technology and have replaced the previous generation of phones at a rapid rate, as shown by the high smartphone adoption rate in Sweden. This story alone does not add to the field of mobile tech development but it does raise awareness about Sweden as a potential market for developers or smartphone producers. Finally, this story does not have a significant impact on the economic state of mobile technology. However, Sweden is clearly a significant smartphone market and could provide economic opportunities for developers if they had a product that would appeal to that region.

Categories
iPad resource usability

Slader’s mobile app rewards students for helping eachother with homework

One of the best things about being an adult is we don’t have to do homework.

Ed-tech startup Slader released a mobile app today to make homework a less painful part of students’ lives.

Slader is an online network where students can collaborate and help each other with their homework. They join academic classes and find the relevant textbooks. From there students can post homework assignments, pose questions to their peers, and view and share their work.

Slader said it has worked with over 2 million students around the world and helped solve more than 2 million problems to date. Slader’s goal is to make working on homework at home more collaborative. The network encourages students to work together to answer their own questions, rather than puzzling over it on their own.

 http://venturebeat.com/2013/11/07/sladers-mobile-app-rewards-students-for-helping-eachother-with-homework/

 

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development mobile news resource usability

Georgia Tech employing new way of using wifi

Focus the Wi-Fi signal from the ceiling-mounted access point in a precise cone-shaped pattern, that’s the trick. Users now consistently get up to 144Mbps instead of crappy signal like before, and like we’re used to here at FSU.

 

http://www.networkworld.com/news/2013/110413-georgia-tech-antennas-275521.html?hpg1=bn

Categories
Android resource usability

Kill Android’s crapware and avoid security holes

Security holes in pre-installed apps on Android can hurt your phone, so prepare yourself better by just getting rid of these useless apps. There’s software called NoBloat Free can that help with this.

http://www.itworld.com/security/381716/want-protect-your-android-phone-heres-how-kill-its-crapware

Categories
mobile development resource usability

The Pre-fetching method, and how Uber uses it wrong

Pre-fetching is a method for loading Webpages and other content in a (ideally) quick way; necessary content for the requested page is loaded first, while subsequent pages are loaded in the background. The goal of this method is to load an entire site at once, making the user’s navigation to other pages faster and more seamless. For example, a user opens a website and the Home-page opens. While the user is looking at the Home-page, the other pages are pre-loaded in the background so they won’t need to be loaded when the user navigates elsewhere. However, if this method is done incorrectly, the Home-page can fail to load quickly while other content is being loaded and the entire process defeats itself.

Keynote, a company that runs analyses on websites and applications, released new data on startup times. Uber, an application for finding personal drivers and transportation, was tested as having a very long startup time of 19.6 seconds. The Uber app uses pre-fetching to load its content, although it is an excellent example of using the method incorrectly. When the Uber website is loaded, over 50 HTTP requests are sent, and the slow startup time is due to many non-essential elements being loaded before those that are essential to the user.

Here’s more about how the Uber apps use Pre-fetching, and why it is implemented poorly: http://venturebeat.com/2013/11/07/why-are-ubers-apps-slow-to-load-its-due-to-pre-fetching/

Categories
iPhone mobile news usability

App unlocks Mac with two thumps on your iPhone

A new iOS app, Knock, uses Bluetooth low energy technology to let you skip over the password process on a Mac and simply tap the back of your iPhone. The founders of ‘Knock’ want to make getting into your computer as easy as rapping your knuckles through the pocket of your jeans.

The iOS app is $3.99 and works in conjunction with a free Mac counterpart.For the app to work (which it does with moderate regularity in my limited experience), your iPhone must have the app running in the background at all times. However, the phone does not need to be unlocked to register the knocking.

Here is a promotional video for further explanation.

 

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57610972-94/knock-knock-app-unlocks-mac-with-two-thumps-on-your-iphone/

Categories
iOS iPhone mobile development usability

Knock iPhone App Wirelessly Unlocks your Mac

A new app called Knock allows users to unlock their computers without a password. For $3.99 Knock allows a Mac to be unlocked just by knocking on a paired iPhone. The two devices connect over Bluetooth LE, allowing a phone to automatically detect when it nears a paired computer. Though the knocking effect can also be achieved by waving an iPhone in the air, Knock suggests just tapping on it through your pants’ pocket, so you never have to pick up the device.

 

http://www.theverge.com/2013/11/5/5069614/knock-iphone-app-wirelessly-unlocks-your-mac

Categories
mobile development mobile news usability

Karma gives you karma for sharing

A new startup, Karma, gives you rewards when you share your internet access from one of their hotspots Karma’s master plan is, after buying the hotspot for a fixed price/data rate, the company offers you 100MB for the extra people that use your hotspot. The people using it don’t take from your data usage, and you get more data the more people there are using it! Karma is moving it’s service to Sprint’s LTE network, which will increase data speeds and usage.

 

Mobile hotspot sharing startup Karma jumps to Sprint’s LTE 4G network

Categories
iPhone mobile news usability

ESPN mobile properties saw more unique visitors than ESPN.com in September for first time ever – GeekWire

ESPN mobile properties saw more unique visitors than ESPN.com in September for first time ever – GeekWire.

This September, ESPN saw more unique visitors navigate to their mobile properties than on ESPN.com. This is the first time this has happened and is another example of the shift to reliance on mobile devices for information. “According to comScore’s Multi-Platform data, ESPN saw 47.4 million people using its mobile products — just a tad more than the 46.1 million accessing ESPN.com.” This is an example of how mobile technology is disruptive to previous generations of technology, like ESPN’s desktop website. This does not represent a development in mobile technology, but the continued success of mobile technology as an industry. Finally, it does not change the economic state of mobile technology because there is no opportunity for 3rd party developers to profit of off this information since ESPN has built their following and viewership through years of branding and market placement.  

Categories
mobile news usability

College Football: Declining Student Attendance Hits Georgia – WSJ.com

College Football: Declining Student Attendance Hits Georgia – WSJ.com.

A growing problem with college football is the fan experience in the stadium. With the comforts of home like HD TV, cold drinks and a comfortable seat, many are opting out of spending money on tickets and actually attending the games. The Wall Street Journal took a look at student attendance numbers at a number of SEC schools and found that those schools were having difficulty getting students to attend games. The reason for this may not be the comforts of home but may be due to the poor cell service and lack of internet connectivity inside the stadium. I have personally experienced this in Doak Campbell Stadium but as someone who loves attending the games, you accept that you won’t be able to use your phone for much more than taking pictures during the game. But for many that desire to tweet, Instagram and post on Facebook about their time at the game or stay up to date with what others are saying, the lack of service is a problem. However, providing Wi-Fi services could cost anywhere from $2 million to $10 million, which is a significant cost for a service that could result in more students looking down at their phones instead of up at the game. Implementing this type of system is not disruptive technology; it allows those at the game to use their phones as they would normally outside of the venue. This is not a new advancement in mobile technology as teams like the Seattle Seahawks in the NFL are already doing something about the lack of service inside their stadium. Finally, it does not add to the economic state of mobile technology or development but, as stated above, is a significant cost to the school or organization wishing to implement it.

Categories
disruptive technology mobile development usability

Crop of High-Tech Farmers Sows Results with Apps

This article talks about farmers using technology to efficiently manage and harvest their crops year after year. The technology provides farmers with information they can use to determine the best farming methods, right times of the year, and other factors that play an important role in successfully producing crop. Recently, an agronomist from the University of Vermont Extension developed an application that digitizes information that used to be kept in notebooks and stores it in the “cloud”, where it can be shared with fellow farmers and can’t blow out of a pickup or tractor and get lost. Application development is all about making processes simpler and cutting out unnecessary steps in performing a task and that is exactly what this app does for farmers that openly embrace new technology. To read more about this specific application and the uses of technology for agriculture in general, be sure to read the full article.

Source: Crop of High-Tech Farmers Sows Results with Apps

Categories
Android iOS mobile development usability

How your smartphone uses its co-pilot for good effect

The many uses for smartphones are increasing day by day and the possibilities seem limitless. One of the next big capabilities smartphone makers and application developers are making use of are the coprocessor’s abilities to track data even while the user is not using their smartphone. This is something that has been around for a little while, but previously, it required the use of a Bluetooth connection and an application being open on the smartphone. Now, the smartphone can be completely idle with the display off and no applications open, yet still make use of this new responsive technology through the coprocessor in the smartphone. It collects sensor data from integrated accelerometers, gyroscopes, and compasses.  This can be used to track information for users and implement the information into applications such as fitness trackers before the user opens the app for the first time. Making use of this technology is something application developers will definitely want to consider as it could completely blow the user away during their “out of the box experience”.

Source: How your smartphone uses its co-pilot for good effect

Categories
iOS iPhone mobile development usability

Cycloramic app turns iPhone 5s into a hands-free 360-degree panoramic camera

Egos Ventures, an Atlanta, Georgia-based company has created an app called Cycloramic. The app makes use of the high-quality camera and vibrating motor in the iPhone 5 and 5s to create a hands-free 360-degree video camera. Thanks to the flat edges and balanced weight distribution of the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5, Cycloramic is able to use the handsets’ vibrating motors to actually physically rotate the devices on a flat surface while recording. This means that the phones are able to record video or capture panoramic photographs without any user intervention. Just place it on a flat surface, tap a button, and the phone will slowly rotate 360 degrees as it captures video or a panoramic photo.

http://bgr.com/2013/11/01/iphone-5s-panorama-360-cycloramic/

Categories
iPad resource usability

iPad Air launch greeted with low repairability score

iFixit on Thursday published its official iPad Air teardown, examining the device’s internal components and determining how easy it is to take apart and fix. The company, which tears down a wide array of technology products, gave the iPad Air a repairability score of just 2 out of 10, saying that if the tablet is taken apart, there’s a chance the device’s glass could be damaged

 

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57610366-94/ipad-air-launch-greeted-with-low-repairability-score/

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Android mobile news usability

Google to Samsung Galaxy Nexus owners: No KitKat for you

Owners of Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus won’t be able to bite into Android 4.4 KitKat. In a new FAQ, Google broke the news that the latest flavor of Android won’t be available as a system update for the 2-year-old Nexus. The company said that the phone falls outside the 18-month time frame in which devices traditionally receive such updates.

Google has confirmed that the Nexus 4, Nexus 7, and Nexus 10 will all be getting a taste of KitKat. Unveiled on Thursday, the Nexus 5 already comes with Android 4.4.

 

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57610382-94/google-to-samsung-galaxy-nexus-owners-no-kitkat-for-you/

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mobile development mobile news resource usability

6 Design Tips For Improving Your Mobile Retail Conversions

Hipmob, author Ayo Omojola, provides tips on how to help mobile businesses better communicate to custoemrs. This particular post focuses on design choices prevalent in mobile retail and mobile eCommerce apps. The tips are as follows:

  1. Pictures Matter
  2. Bring the “point” front and center
  3. Bring the “call-to-action” front and center
  4. Limit the amount of taps
  5. Turn the funnel upside down
  6. Think Paypal and Amazon, not Visa and Amex

Omojola says “All in – this gets you a mobile shopping interface which takes 3 clicks to buy. Doesn’t work for everyone, but if you plan to sell real world goods or services from a mobile interface, it’s a good start. ”

Read more about Omojola’s tips in Forbes Cyber Monday Prep article 6 Design Tips For Improving Your Mobile Retail Conversions

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mobile news usability

Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatches have embarrassing 30% return rate | VentureBeat

Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatches have embarrassing 30% return rate | VentureBeat.

In September, Samsung announced their smart watch, the Galaxy Gear. The Galaxy Gear positioned itself as “the next big thing” as it is one of the first smart watches on the market and analysts and consumers both anticipated the release, waiting to see if Samsung’s foray into wearable technology would be a hit. However, it appears that the public has been less than satisfied with Samsung’s latest product. A document leaked to Geek.com reported that the Galaxy Gear has a return rate of about 30% at Best Buy locations. The team of reviewers at Venture Beat might not have been surprised by these results as their experiences with the Gear could be described as “clumsy, unfashionable and relentlessly inessential.” The reason for the lack of the Gear’s success could be its pricey $300 price tag or the user experience but Samsung is asking the Best Buy employees for input to try find the cause of this high return rate. The Galaxy Gear is not an example of disruptive technology, while it attempted to break into a fairly untapped market, their attempt could not be categorized as successful thus far. However, the Galaxy Gear still adds to the field of mobile tech development because it provides an case study for other developers to analyze what consumers liked and disliked about the Galaxy Gear. This gives them valuable information about the market and could contribute to future developments related to smart watches or wearable technology. Finally, the high returns of the Galaxy Gear effects Samsung in an economic way, but does not have a significant impact on the market as a whole.

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disruptive technology mobile development mobile news usability

Motorola announces Project Ara, an open hardware platform with modular components ala Phonebloks

Motorola announces Project Ara, an open hardware platform with modular components ala Phonebloks.

A few weeks ago, a project called Phonebloks went viral and caught the attention of the tech and mobile industry. Phonebloks was different than a traditional smartphone because of its modular design, allowing 3rd party developers to create pieces or parts of the phone and users can pick and choose the individual components that go into their smartphone. While this may sound like a pipe dream, Motorola is set on bringing this open based modular smartphone to life, through a platform called Project Ara. Each device will come with an exoskeleton to hold the various phone components together, outside of that the possibilities are only limited by the number of components you can fit onto the exoskeleton and the creativity of 3rd party developers. The most amazing part of this announcement is that Motorola has been working on this idea for over a year and now that Motorola has teamed up with the creator of Phonebloks the idea will continue to grow and progress. Project Ara has the potential to be disruptive technology and could grow to replace the smartphones we know and love today. The ability for users to personalize and customize their phone to tailor it to their own needs is something that other companies like Android and Apple have not offered and therefore Project Ara has been able to differentiate themselves from the cluttered smartphone market. It adds to the field of mobile development because it is an entirely new way to think about smartphones. With an Apple iPhone, you as a consumer are not supposed to open it up and tinker with it and find out how it works, Apple wants you to just use the device as is. With Project Ara, it encourages the user to learn about their phone, how it works and what all the individual components do. It educates the user on their device and makes them more knowledgable about the technology they use. In addition to this, it changes the field of mobile tech development because when a new technology or component is created, users are not forced to buy an entirely new phone just to get it, with Project Ara they could simply purchase that new component and install it in their existing device. Finally, Project Ara has the potential to change the state of mobile technology in the future because users will be drawn to the longevity and ability to customize that Project Ara offers, taking away profits from other mobile companies. In addition, if Project Ara takes hold in the market, users will be less inclined to throw away their device for an entirely new one and will be encouraged to simply buy new components for their device to keep it up to par with the current standard in mobile technology.

Categories
Android mobile development mobile news Uncategorized usability

A Smartphone with a Curve

The company LG announced today a smartphone (technically a phablet) called the LG G Flex that is a device that curves.  LG claims the benefits of the curved phone is that it fits the human face better when talking on the phone, it create better sound, gives an “IMAX” feel while in landscape mode, and it fits better into a person’s pocket.  Although this is a cool and innovative idea for a smartphone, the curved screen does not add as much benefits as one may think.  As for the phone fitting the face better while talking or it being easier to get the phone out of our pocket are not significant enough competitive advantages to get the LG G Flex.  Most of the time when a phone is hard to pull out of a pocket, it is because it has a case on it. Or to say that the iphone has an “IMAX” feel to it is not really accurate, yes it curves similar to an IMAX screen but IMAX is special because it is so big and, well even though it is a phablet and not just a smartphone, it is not even close to IMAX.

This phone is all in all cool but does not seem to add new features that are very practical, but it is innovative and it will be interesting to see where technology progresses.

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/10/28/lg_g_flex_smartphone/

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Android usability

Cover introduces Android lock screen customization

Cover, the product of ex-Facebook, Google, and Yahoo engineers, replaces your default Android lock screen with one that knows where you are and what time of day it is to provide you with quick shortcuts to the apps you use the most in each scenario. For instance, when you are at work, Cover might put Gmail, Calendar, and Dropbox icons right on your lock screen, while at home it might replace those with Netflix, YouTube, and Sonos apps. The system learns your behavior, and after a few days of use, it puts the most used apps at the top of its vertical list.

Cover is a good start. We’ve been testing it on a number of Android smartphones, and performance is impressive; scrolling is smooth, the app is quick and responsive, and it doesn’t use a whole lot of resources, even with its Peek and quick app-switching features.

The app was built from scratch in a mere seven months. Right now, the app is most useful for right-handed people — all of the gestures and layouts work best using your right thumb. It’s not possible to pin or customize the app shortcuts on the lock screen (that is a planned feature in Cover’s roadmap), and there’s plenty of empty space that can be used for things such as upcoming calendar appointments and message previews.

 

http://www.theverge.com/2013/10/24/5024652/cover-android-lock-screen-context-movement

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Android iPhone mobile news usability

Smartphone notifications via smell of bacon

 

Scentee wants to expand your smartphone horizons and add smell to the senses your phone already stimulates. The plug-in accessory attaches to headphone socket on both iPhones and Android smartphones and, when told to by the companion app, releases a burst of fragrance, paired with a customizable LED light.

In no particular order, aromas include rose, mint, cinnamon roll, bacon, coffee, curry, jasmine, ylang-ylang, lavender, apple, coconut, strawberry and, corn soup.

 

http://www.engadget.com/2013/10/25/scentee-accessory-smell-android-ios/

Categories
Android disruptive technology mobile development mobile news usability

Firefox Plug-In Shows Who Is Tracking You

Mozilla Lightbeam is an plug-in for Firefox which is being implemented to track data acquired by cookies.

Read the article here.

Categories
Android disruptive technology iOS mobile development mobile news Uncategorized usability

How many users are actually using BBM?

Earlier this week on Monday, BlackBerry released their messaging system, BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) for Android and iOS to reach more users. In recent years BlackBerry has been losing to its competition, Android and iOS in sales and to still try and maintain some of their users who have switch devices they are expanding their only competitive advantage to all major platforms.  Within 24 hours over 10 million users downloaded the app which seems like a big number and a successful number, but that is only have of it, the other half is getting the users to make an account, and use the new app when they have plenty of other options already available to them that have been developed by Apple like iMessage.  Only about 5 million users have actually activated their account with BBM and to get the full features of the app you must activate the app.  Hopefully BBM will figure out a way to get more users to not only just download the app, but to actually start using it.

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/10/23/blackberry_messenger_celebrates_10m_downloads/